Are The Berries On Indian Hawthorn Edible

Are The Berries On Indian Hawthorn Edible – Rhaphiolepis indica is grown for its decorative pink or white flowers and is popular in bonsai culture. The fruit is edible when cooked. It is a small, slow-growing shrub perfect for sunny places. It is easy to take care of, because it naturally maintains a neat, rounded shape, without the need for cutting. Large, loose clusters of fragrant, pink or white flowers bloom in spring. The flowers are followed by small blue berries that attract wildlife. Indian hawthorn plants grow well in containers as well as coastal sites with salty soil. Rhaphiolepis umbellata – ‘Yeddo Hawthorn’ bears fragrant white flowers 2 cm wide, in early summer, and these are followed by small, fleshy black fruits. Yeddo hawthorn plants grow well in containers as well as coastal sites with salty soil. Grow in a sheltered area from dry or cold winds in a moist, moderately fertile soil in full sun Rhaphiolepis indica is grown for its decorative pink or white flowers and is popular in bonsai culture. The fruit is edible when cooked.

Indian Hawthorn grows best in full sun, but also tolerates afternoon shade. If it gets too much shade, the shrub loses its neat, compact growth habit. It is not fussy about the soil, but it is a good idea to work in some compost before planting if the soil is heavy clay or sand. It can tolerate salt spray and salty soil, making them ideal for coastal plants.

Are The Berries On Indian Hawthorn Edible

Take semi-ripe cuttings from this season’s growth in the fall. Cut neatly, just below a leaf node, a 5″ piece of healthy shoot that has soft growth at the tip. Pinch out the growing tip, and cut off the lower leaves. Dip the lower part of the cut in hormone root powder. , and carefully put in a pot of cutting compost with the leaves just above the compost level. Water, label, covered with a polyethylene bag and put in a warm, bright place, out of direct sunlight, Remove the polythene bag periodically for a period of time for ventilation (on the at least twice a week)

Food For Free: How To Make Hawthorn Jelly

Indian hawthorn flowers are white or pink, and appear in loose clusters in late winter or spring, and these flowers are often followed by small purple fruits that are attractive to birds. There is sometimes a second bloom in autumn – less impressive than spring bloom.) is a small, slow-growing shrub perfect for sunny places. It is easy to take care of, because it naturally maintains a neat, rounded shape, without the need for cutting. The shrub looks good all year round and becomes a focal point in spring when large, loose clusters of fragrant, pink or white flowers bloom. The flowers are followed by small blue berries that attract wildlife. Read on to find out how to grow Indian Hawthorn.

Indian hawthorn is evergreen, so the dark green, leathery leaves remain on the branches all year round, and take on a purple color in winter. The shrub survives winters in mild climates and is rated for USDA plant hardiness zones 8 through 11.

You will find many uses for Indian hawthorn plants. Planted close together, they form a dense hedge. You can also use rows of Indian hawthorn as barriers or dividers between sections of the garden. The plants tolerate salt spray and salty soil, making them ideal for coastal planting. Indian hawthorn plants grow well in containers, so you can also use them on terraces, decks and verandas.

Indian hawthorn care begins with planting the shrub in a place where it can flourish. It grows best in full sun, but also tolerates afternoon shade. Planting Indian hawthorn where it receives too much shade will cause the shrub to lose its neat, compact growth habit.

Indian Hawthorn Varieties

It is not picky about the soil, but it is a good idea to work in some compost before planting if the soil is heavy clay or sand. The different species and varieties grow between 3 and 6 feet (1-2 m.) wide and spread a little further than their height, so space them accordingly.

Water newly planted Indian Hawthorn shrubs regularly to keep the soil moist until they are well established and begin to set new leaves. Once established, Indian hawthorn tolerates moderate drought.

Fertilize the shrub for the first time in the spring of the year after planting, and every spring and fall thereafter. Feed the shrub lightly with a general purpose fertilizer.

Indian hawthorn almost never needs pruning. You may need to prune lightly to remove dead and damaged branches, and you can do this type of pruning any time of the year. If the shrub needs additional pruning, do so immediately after the flowers fade.Hawthorn berry harvest is a new one for me this year. They are sweet and tender if you get them at the right time, and in recent years I have tasted them too early in the fall. This year, Washington hawthorn was sweet and mild in late October. But at that time, single-seeded hawthorn started to rot, so next year I will look for those in mid-October.

Edible Berries Archives

I owe some credit to Josh Fecteau’s recent hawthorn post, which inspired me to try hawthorn berries again. As Josh points out, there are many hawthorn species, perhaps 50 in New England. And, in all of North America, possibly a thousand species, according to George Symonds (from his wonderful book Tree Identification Book: A New Method for the Practical Identification and Recognition of Trees).

, my favorite guide to learning tree ID). Fortunately, you don’t have to be able to identify specific species. You just need to know it’s a hawthorn because all hawthorns have edible berries. HOWEVER, like apple seeds, hawthorn seeds contain cyanide, and should not be eaten. Don’t panic; just spit out the seeds.

Why bother with hawthorns? They are beautiful, interesting and delicious wild food with known health benefits. Some people use the berries to make hawthorn jelly, but I haven’t tried that yet. Berries, leaves and flowers can be used to make a tea. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to see how I make hawthorn berry extract.

I will describe two species here to illustrate the general characteristics. That should help you recognize a hawthorn when you see one, but I do

Indian Hawthorn (rhaphiolepis Indica) Leaf Spot

If you are unsure that you have a hawthorn when feeding, please check. with additional sources until you are sure before eating the berries.

This grows as a small tree or large shrub, bearing clusters of white flowers in late spring. The berries turn red in September (here), but later turn sweet. Until October 31, they were sweet, and maybe a little later peak. Each berry has 3-5 seeds.

The leaves are lobed and toothed, as you can see in my photo above. Many other hawthorn species have similar leaves. The tree is heavily armed with long thorns, up to about 3 inches long. However, with reasonable caution, you can easily eat the berries that tend to hang from the branch. It is even easier later in the season after many of the leaves have fallen and the thorns are no longer hiding.

Also commonly called hawthorn, this is a European native that escaped cultivation and became naturalized in North America. It’s sometimes labeled as an invasive plant, but I don’t find it very often, and when I do see it, it’s not much in one area. Maybe it’s invasive in other parts of the country, but it doesn’t seem to be particularly aggressive here. Like Washington hawthorn, single-seeded hawthorn grows as a shrub or small tree, bearing clusters of white flowers in late spring. The oval red berries ripen a little earlier (like Washington hawthorn) in the fall and contain a single seed (hence the name). The toothed leaves are more deeply lobed than those of the Washington Hawthorn, but the thorns are much smaller, only about 1/2 inch to an inch long.

Eleanor Taber Indian Hawthorn (2.4 Gallon) Pink Blooming Evergreen Shrub

Hawthorns are common in the forest here in Massachusetts, but these are scrawny specimens that do not bear good fruit. It is too sharp in the forest. To find fruit-laden hawthorns, look in sunny spots, such as shrubbery and thickets, near pasture edges and along streams. They are often planted as ornamentals, so if your friend has one and doesn’t mind picking a few berries, you’ll have an easy foraging experience at your fingertips.

This is my first experience with hawthorn berries, and I use them to make an extract, using the same process you use to make vanilla extract. I hope to use hawthorn extract as a flavoring in cooking and baking. I filled a clean canning jar about 3/4 full with berries, covered it with 80 proof vodka, and capped the jar. I’m not sure how long it takes to extract enough flavor from the berries, so I’ll check it daily. I know that other extracts (like vanilla extract) take weeks, so I expect that here. Information possibly out of date The information presented on this page was originally published on February 25, 2019.