Hawthorn Berries Chickens

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Description: F. E. E. DING YOUR CHICKEN: BERRIES. RELATING TO POULTRY – FEEDING YOUR CHICKEN: BERRIES . Text and photos: Paul Cuypers, Belgium. I love feeding my orpingtonsā€¦

Hawthorn Berries Chickens

FEEDING YOUR CHICKEN: BERRIES FISH RELATING TO POULTRY – FEEDING YOUR CHICKEN: BERRIES Text and photos: Paul Cuypers, Belgium. I like to feed my Orpingtons herbs and vegetables as well as berries and nuts. The more variety the better, so I’m always looking for something extra. In the second half of the year, it is possible to collect anywhere for free, especially berries and rosehips. (Note: I use the term “berries” even though some are actually fruits/shells). I feed them rosehip and berries of rowan, hawthorn, elderberry, blackthorn, thorn and sea buckthorn. In the season – August to November – often 1 to 2 buckets per day, that is for 40 to 50 adult chickens. Rose hips, sea buckthorn and sea buckthorn are popular. Most of these fruits contain carotene and many vitamins. Right: Hawthorn berries. In our region, the people of the NatureOrganization planted many berry trees and bushes in projects to ensure that hedgerows and hedgerows for birds and other small creatures reappear in the natural environment. In early autumn, these hedges bulge with chicken feed, such as an abundance of hawthorn with dense reddish-brown berries. My Orpingtons are happy to eat them and eagerly eat the leaves that come when they are harvested. There are also many thorns. The berries are dark blue, about 1 cm thick, with a large stone inside. They are very bitter, but the chickens eat everything I give them. Buckthorn berries in gin make a tasty alcoholic drink in case you collect too many for the chickens to eat. Left: Blackthorn / blackthorn berries. The small hard sides of eglantine and dog rose are the hardest to pick, but they are worth the effort because the birds really like to eat them. Because the pulp is so hard, it doesn’t spoil, you can easily store it for more than a week and have a handful every now and then. Below, right and left: Dog rose and rugosa arrows. Rugosa arrows are softer and thicker, making them ideal for feeding. Chicks are completely dependent on the amount of small seeds that are inside and when the last seed is gone. , they also eat all fruit pulps. This is also very good for us, it’s full of vitamin C. You can feed arrowroot right off the bush well into winter, unless you have a lot of wild birds in your garden, as partridges will also feed on it. They are very easy to collect. They hang in bundles and there are no thorns in the way. If you know where to find some not-too-tall rowanberries, you’ll have a bucket full of berries in 5 minutes. Right: European mountain ash loaded with berries. Elderberries are also great. They are black, very tender and contain a lot of blue juice. Super healthy, although picking can turn into a mess. That’s why I usually just break a twig and put it on the ground as I run, or tie it to a net. Chicks eat the berries from the twigs and they also eat the leaves. Above: Twigs with sea buckthorn (yellowish) – and elderberries (black). By the way, I noticed that my orpingtons like to eat elderberry bark too. There are quite a few old men in my pens that have trunks over 10cm thick and the chickens peck them up to the available height. Elderberries can cause a little bluish-black diarrhea, just like thrush, but it won’t hurt. As with all supplements, it’s best not to overdo it. A lot of variation in the things offered prevents such problems. Although not actually berries, the small fruits of the black cherry are also good for feeding birds. They multiply as weeds in some places and the chickens really like to eat the bitter mini cherries. In the ornamental garden of every breeder, there really should be a thorn or a Pyracantha. You can cut it in all shapes and the berries are great. Of course, this is again a bush with vicious thorns, so you have to be willing to put up with the trouble. These are relatively hard and dry berries that are very suitable for freezing, as well as the fruits of sea buckthorn and rowan. Left: Blackthorn with berries. I also like to feed sea buckthorn berries if I can find some. I planted some sea buckthorn bushes a few years ago, but they don’t bear any berries. As it turns out, there are male and female plants and apparently the ones I have are all the same sex. In the meantime I have planted some new ones and hopefully the problem has been resolved. I’ve been meaning to plant sea buckthorn for a long time, but I didn’t know where to buy it. I was able to experiment several times because I was allowed to harvest at a friend’s place. Especially in coastal areas, these berries are very common and you should definitely try to feed them if you have the chance. Right: Arrows frozen on bushes. The berries are very sour and the branches are full of thorns, but for the animals it is a perfect success. I weave most of the twigs into the netting of the enclosures, and within a few days the animals expertly tear them off. I always put some in the freezer. Because of the thorns, it is noticeable to pick berries from the branches, but this is also the case with reeds, hawthorns, brambles and rosehips. they look as if they were freshly plucked. For example, hawthorn berries immediately turn brown when thawed. It was to be expected that it would go well with sea buckthorn, because in nature the berries remain good even after frost. This is also so that the birds can get drunk when they eat the orange oval berries after the frosts, because the frost causes the starch to partially turn into sugars, which then turn into alcohol. The berries are in clusters near the branches and twigs. taste extremely sour. They contain a range of phytochemicals that can have preventive or positive effects on your health, vitamin A, B1, B2 and E and especially high levels of vitamin C, much more than oranges. It is always stated that chickens are able to synthesize vitamin C and so lacking vitamin C, people may not be that sick (you know, Columbus’ men on long voyages who died of scurvy). However, Ifeela overlooks an important factor, which is that vitamin C can be helpful for various winter ailments, and it will be much easier and therefore more efficient for chickens to obtain it than to “make” it. Correct: Sea buckthorn twigs full of berries. Left: Sea buckthorn berries and leaves, ready to put in the fridge. In herbal shops, berry-based syrups are sold as a dietary supplement, and medicinal oil is obtained from the seeds. Flycatchers, such as greenwings, ignore the flesh of the fruit and eat only the seeds, while thrushes and starlings eat the whole berries. The fact that the berries are so acidic makes them more interesting because it can’t hurt when an acidic environment is created inside them. intestines of our chickens from time to time, just the opposite. In our hobby – and also in pigeon breeding – the birds’ drinking water is often slightly acidified, mainly with apple cider vinegar. With a generous portion of sea buckthorn berries, you can achieve the same effect in a completely natural way and completely free. Sea buckthorn, fresh or preserved in the freezer, is ideal for feeding in the middle of winter, in preparation for the breeding season and to provide extra vitality in the show season. Sea buckthorn leaves can also be fed as they automatically come with the berries if you take them to the freezer in a hurry. Just be careful to carefully remove all the thorns; also there is usually a thorn at the base of each shoot! When my own bushes bear fruit, I shall have fresh berries on hand from August to January; I probably won’t pick them, just cut off a branch full of berries and let the hens do all the work, simple. Having your own berries in the garden is always the easiest. Instant, fresh from the bush, little waste of time. Many of the above species need little pruning, so they don’t need a lot of space. And they also do well in a chicken run while providing some shade. For example, elderberry is ideal for serving as a shade. Baza can withstand everything. You can trim and saw as much as you like, so it’s always the exact size you prefer, even if it’s 20 years old. In spring, you can also feed the flowers or make elderflower tea. Chickens can be fed rosehips of all kinds of roses, so a beautiful flower garden is an excellent food

Good Treats For A Happier Flock Of Chickens!